KJV Dictionary Definition: wind


WIND, n. L., G. The primary sense is to move, flow, rush or drive along.

1. Air in motion with any degree of velocity, indefinitely; a current of air. When the air moves moderately, we call it a light wind, or a breeze; when with more velocity, we call it a fresh breeze, and when with violence, we call it a gale, storm or tempest. The word gale is used by the poets for a moderate breeze, but seamen use it as equivalent to storm. Winds are denominated from the point of compass from which they blow; as a north wind; an east wind; a south wind; a west wind; a southwest wind, &c.

2. The four winds, the cardinal points of the heavens.

Come from the four winds, O breath, and breathe upon these slain. Ezekiel 37.

This sense of the word seems to have had its origin with the orientals, as it was the practice of the Hebrews to give to each of the four cardinal points the name of wind.

3. Direction of the wind from other points of the compass than the cardinal, or any point of compass; as a compass of eight winds.

4. Breath; power of respiration.

If my wind were but long enough to say my prayers, I would repent.

5. Air in motion form any force or action; as the wind of a cannon ball; the wind of a bellows.

6. Breath modulated by the organs or by an instrument.

Their instruments were various in their kind, some for the bow, and some for breathing wind.

7. Air impregnated with scent.

A pack of dog-fish had him in the wind.

8. Any thing insignificant or light as wind.

Think not with wind or airy threats to awe.

9. Flatulence; air generated in the stomach and bowels; as, to be troubled with wind.

10. The name given to a disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.

Down the wind, decaying; declining; in a state of decay; as, he went down the wind. Not used.

To take or have the wind, or to get wind, to be divulged; to become public. The story got wind, or took wind.

In the winds eye, in seamens language, towards the direct point from which the wind blows.

Between wind and water, denoting that part of a ships side or bottom which is frequently brought above water by the rolling of the ship, or fluctuation of the waters surface.

To carry the wind, in the manege, is when a horse tosses his nose as high as his ears.

Constant or perennial wind, a wind that blows constantly from one point of the compass; as the trade wind of the tropics.

Shifting, variable or erratic winds, are such as are changeable, now blowing from one point and now from another, and then ceasing altogether.

Stated or periodical wind, a wind that constantly returns at a certain time, and blows steadily from one point for a certain time. Such are the monsoons in India, and land and sea breezes.

Trade wind, a wind that blows constantly from one point, such as the tropical wind in the Atlantic.



1. Turning; binding about; bending.

2. a. Bending; twisting from a direct line or an even surface.


1. A turn or turning; a bend; flexure; meander; as the windings of a road or stream.

2. A call by the boastswains whistle.